Friday, 21 June 2019

Different families

Bride's Dad Stops Wedding So Stepdad Can Walk Down The Aisle

As Todd Bachman walked his daughter Brittany down the aisle at the start of her wedding, he stopped the procession. He ran to the front row and grabbed the hand of Brittany's Step-Dad, taking him to walk their daughter down the aisle together. 

Later in an interview the Step-Dad said, "He came and grabbed my hand and said, 'You worked as hard as I have. You'll help us walk our daughter down the aisle'.... I got weak in my knees and lost it. Nothing better in my life, the most impactful moment in my life."

The two Dads admitted they had not always got along, but Todd said, "For me to thank him for all the years of helping raise our daughter wouldn't be enough. There is no better way to thank somebody than to assist me walking her down the aisle."

The photos have gone viral.

What do you see in the picture
Where are they?
what do you think is happening?

- what is a wedding for?
- what is "walking down the aisle"? traditionally who does that bit?
- why has Brittany got two Dads?
- Why do you think Brittany's Step-Dad wasn't asked to walk her down the aisle?
- how do you think he felt as he watched Todd walk Brittany down the aisle?
- Why did Todd stop the procession?
- Look at the face of the guest next to the Step-Dad as Todd grabs his hand, what is she thinking?
- Look at Todd's face; what is he thinking?
- How is Step-dad feeling?
- How do you think Brittany felt when she saw both her Dad's walking down the aisle together?
- why is this about different families?
- why have the photos gone viral? What does this show us about how people across the world see families?
- what can we learn from  Todd?
- why is this about No Outsiders?


Saturday, 15 June 2019

lorry driver


The clip was filmed by Dave Woollaston - also a truck driver - when he traveled through Birmingham on Monday
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-england-birmingham-48588841/the-lorry-driver-in-birmingham-whose-kindness-went-viral?fbclid=IwAR3sToVlJBZHva9F5Pn4NjSxQjAcklwkpI8z9mDZ3jWRWrFujnicbsMq7Rs

Manilo Wilson is a lorry driver from Birmingham. While working last week he noticed an elderly woman having trouble crossing a busy road. Manilo stopped his cement mixer and got out, to help the stranger cross the road.

The driver behind Manilo's lorry recorded the incident and up;loaded it to social media and it had gone viral.

Manilo says, it's in his nature to help people.

What do you see in the picture?
What do you think is happening?

explain the story

- why was the elderly woman having trouble crossing the road?
- why weren't people stopping for her?
- why do you think Manilo stopped?
- why did other cars wait behind Manilo?
- How do you think the drivers behind the lorry felt when it stopped?
- How do you think the drivers felt when they realised why the lorry had stopped?
- how are Manilo and the elderly woman different?
- why do you think the film went viral?
- what does this show about people living in the UK today?
- what does community cohesion mean?
- why is this story an example of community cohesion?
- what can we learn from Manilo?
- why is this about No Outsiders?

No Outsiders in our school: Teaching the equality act in primary schools by Andrew Moffat

Reclaiming radical ideas in schools: Preparing young children for life in modern Britain by Andrew Moffat


Sunday, 9 June 2019

Rainbow turban

View image on Twitter
https://www.upworthy.com/barack-obama-celebrates-pride-month-by-tweeting-an-amazing-photo-of-a-sikh-man-in-a-rainbow-turban?c=aah&fbclid=IwAR2OMOjIIhwqELStTIwRajO_mWx0E4ukLxOUCkI9z_EYD5cCEX6ENGSl_2U

Jiwandeep Kohli lives in America where June is National Gay Pride month. Jiwandeep posted a photo of the turban he wears to celebrate pride and tweeted, "I'm proud to be a bisexual, bearded baking brain scientist. I feel fortunate to be able to express all these aspects of my identity and will continue to work towards ensuring the sane freedom for others #pridemonth #prideturban #loveislove"

The post quickly went viral and former US President Barak Obama tweeted; "You've got a lot to be proud of, Jiwandeep. Thanks for everything you do to make this country a little more equal. Turban looks great, by the way. Happy Pride everybody!"

In the Sikh religion a turban represents the idea that all Sikhs are equal in the eyes of God. Jiwandeep says a turban is, "a sign to the world that you're a person the world can turn to for help."

Kholi has made his turban by weaving rainbow colours in to one of his black turbans.

What do you see in the picture?
where do you think it was taken?
what do the rainbow colours symbolise?

explain the picture

- why is Jiwandeep wearing rainbow colours?
- what does Love is Love mean?
- Jiwandeep says he is "a bisexual, bearded, baking, brain scientist" and that he feels, "fortunate to be able to express all aspects of my identity," what does he mean? What is identity? Why doesn't Jiwandeep just choose one identity to be proud of; why doesn't he just say he is "Sikh"?
- do we all have different aspects of identity?
- why does Barak Obama thank Jiwandeep for, "everything you do to make this country a little more equal"?
- why are we unequal sometimes?
- why do you think Jiwandeep wants people to know he is celebrating Pride? Some people might say he shouldn't wear the rainbow turban; why do you think he wants to wear it?
- this photo went viral; what does this show us about many people around the world and their attitude towards LGBT people?
- what can we learn from Jiwandeep?
- why is this story about No Outsiders?

No Outsiders in our school: Teaching the Equality Act in primary schools by Andrew Moffat

Reclaiming radical ideas in schools: Preparing young children for life in modern Britain by Andrew Moffat

Saturday, 1 June 2019

Germany wears the Kippah

Men wear kippahs outside a Jewish community centre in Berlin
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/may/31/germans-urged-wear-kippah-protest-antisemitism?CMP=fb_gu&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Facebook&fbclid=IwAR3G1kxnlZ1RymbYgVJUgn0MWSGjggmz6KMotfTHecEF0Esr8vv8sX7TTBs#Echobox=1559298123

In Germany 2019 there has been a rise in attacks on Jewish people. Last week a member of the government in Germany suggested Jewish people should not wear the Kippah so that they would not be recognised as Jewish and increase the possibility of being attacked. The Kippah is a small cap worn by Jewish men.

Following the comments there has been outcry across Germany. People are saying the answer is not to stop wearing the Kippah; the answer is to teach people about difference and diversity and to stop the attacks. Some MPs told Jews to ignore the warning and to carry on wearing the Kippah. In a visit to Germany, the US secretary of state said, "None of us should shrink in the face of prejudice."

A day of protest has been organised for Saturday where all people of different faith are encouraged to wear a Kippah. One newspaper has printed Kippahs for its readers to cut out and wear for the day. The demonstration is called "Deutschland tragt kippa" - Germany wears the kippa.

What do you see in the picture
Which religion is being practised?
Why is everyone wearing a cap? What is it called?

Explain the story

- Why are some people attacked because of their faith? (This happens because not everyone understands or agrees with 'No Outsiders'. Some people think the world is better of we are all the same and have the same faith, or same skin or live in the same way. It's the opposite view to us, we know that the world is better if we have different faith, different skin, if we live in different ways. We are not frightened of difference. But not everyone understands this view yet.)
- why have Jewish people been advised not to wear the Kippah?
- what do you think of this advice?
- How will this advice make Jewish people feel?
- what does the US Secretary of state mean by, "we must not shrink in the face of prejudice"?
- why are people encouraged to wear Kippah's on Saturday?
- Why is the campaign called "Germany wears the Kippah"? What is the campaign saying about Germany and Jewish people?
- What will the campaign show those people who want to attack people who are different?
- what can we learn from Germany and this campaign?
- Is one day enough? What can people do after the protest to stop prejudice?
- why is this story about No Outsiders?

No Outsiders in our school: Teaching the Equality Act in primary schools by Andrew Moffat

Reclaiming radical ideas in schools: Preparing young children for life in modern Britain by Andrew Moffat


Thursday, 23 May 2019

Birmingham Pride

No photo description available.


National Express West Midlands has a LGBTQ+ rainbow revamp for Birmingham Pride 2019
https://www.iambirmingham.co.uk/2019/05/04/national-express-west-midlands-paints-city-rainbows-ahead-birmingham-pride/

Birmingham is getting ready for Pride weekend and many shops and businesses in the city centre are painted in rainbow colours.

Many cities across the UK and the world hold pride events every year to celebrate their diversity and demonstrate to all families that they are welcome. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender people, and people who identify in lots of different ways, together with all their friends and supporters are encouraged to walk together through the city centre to show no one has to hide who they are. Everyone is welcome; there will be people of different gender, race, religion, disability, age, no one is left out.

The photos show a bus stop in Birmingham City Centre with a bus painted in rainbow colours  a sign in Sainsburys and a cash point; many banks in the city have painted their cash machines rainbow colours and there are many shops with rainbow colour displays.

The theme of Birmingham pride this year is Love Out Loud. Sponsors of Pride, HSBC say, "It's not about gender, race, culture or religion. Just people. And Love. Coming out and wanting the world to know. Open to all. Arm in arm, holding hands. Because when we celebrate our differences, we're part of something far bigger. You are not an island. Together we love."

This year Birmingham pride supports No Outsiders

What do you see in the picture?
Are they usually painted in rainbow colours?
What are the rainbow colours for?

explain the picture

- What do the terms Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender mean?
- Why do you think a rainbow is used to symbolise LGBT pride?
- Read the HSBC quote; what does 'coming out' mean?
- Why do they say, "It's not about gender, race, culture or religion"?
- Why do they say, "You're not an island"?
- Why do so many cities hold pride events?
- When a city holds a pride event, what are they saying about people who are LGBT?
- Why paint a bus in rainbow colours? Will going on the bus make you gay?
- Many shops have signs like the one shown in Sainsburys. Why display this sign?
- How would a person who is LGBT feel as they walk past that sign?
- Why might a person who is LGBT not always feel supported?
- What does British law say about LGBT people?
- Who else does the Equality Act protect?
- Why is this story about No Outsiders?

No Outsiders in our school: Teaching the Equality Act in primary schools by Andrew Moffat

Reclaiming radical ideas in schools: Preparing young children for life in modern Britain by Andrew Moffat 

Thanks to Khakan Qureshi for the cash point photo and Aimee for the Sainsburys photo

Sunday, 12 May 2019

The Wow Boy

Image result for handel and haydn society
https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/orchestra-austism-wow-child-ronan-mattin-boston-classical-concert-a8909391.html?fbclid=IwAR0hMHSohkZyM88LQ3mqpL8Fk7RTnoyd3YFEh7Ah8SaiHDD9pDGg7T-26w4

A nine year old boy went with his Grandfather to see a classical music concert by the Handel and Haydn Orchestra in Boston USA. Ronan Mattin is autistic and does not often use speech but loves music. He rarely expresses himself in words or talks about how he feels.

Ronan listened to the orchestra play Mozart's Masonic Funeral Music and as the piece finished, he exclaimed, "Wow!" The hall was silent and everyone in the audience and on the stage clearly heard Ronan. There was a pause, a ripple of laughter and then the audience applauded.

Ronan's Mum said, "We don't hear words often from him so such a genuine, unprompted response like that was really, really special."

In the days following the concert, the orchestra mailed all their supporters and put a message on their website asking to find the "Wow boy." The president of the orchestra, David Snead said he had, "Never heard anything like it in more than four decades of classical music performing. It was one of the most wonderful moments I've experienced in the concert hall."

When Ronan's family saw the messages they contacted the orchestra and now Ronan has been invited to meet the conductor next time they play in Boston. A recording of the moment Ronan says wow has gone viral. Ronan's Mum says, "We're glad Ronan is providing so much joy to others because that's what he does for us every day."

What do you see in the picture?
what is happening?
where is it taken?

explain the story

- what is autism? (I asked a child with autism how to describe what autism means. Oliver told me, "autism is your brain wired differently so you see the world in a different way. It' just a different view of the world." Oliver says some things are harder for him but but also he better at some things than other children.)
- when people usually attend a classical music concert, what is the expectation for the audience?
- Why do you think Ronan shouted, "Wow" at the end of the music?
- why did everyone else hear him? What was everyone else doing?
- Why were Ronan's family so overjoyed to hear him say, "Wow"?
- how do you think Grandfather first felt when Ronan shouted out?
- Why did the audience laugh?
- The audience then applauded, who were they applauding?
- Was Ronan right to shout, "Wow"?
- Do you think the rest of the audience also loved the music? Why didn't they shout "Wow"?
- How do you think the musicians felt when they heard Ronan?
- "It was one of the most wonderful moments I've experienced in the concert hall" why?
- Why aren't the musicians cross with Ronan?
- why has this story gone viral? What does this show about people around the world and their view of autism and difference?
- what can we learn from Ronan?
- what can we learn from the Handel and Haydn Orchestra?
- why is this story about No Outsiders?

No Outsiders in our school: Teaching the Equality Act in primary schools by Andrew Moffat

Reclaiming radical ideas in schools: Preparing young children for life in modern Britain by Andrew Moffat

Thanks again to Oliver for his brilliant explanation.


Saturday, 11 May 2019

Always be kind


Jamario Howard was eating a meal with his friends in a restaurant in Alabama, USA when he noticed an elderly woman sitting on her own at a table. Jamario says, "I don't ever want to eat alone, so I decided to talk to her."

Jamario approached the woman, he says she had a look on her face as he approached. He introduced himself and they started chatting. The woman's name was Eleanor Baker; she told Jamario she had lost her husband and the next day would have been their 60th wedding anniversary. Jamario invited 
Eleanor to join his friends on their table.

Jamario says, "She was excited to sit with us and came over straight away. We all felt really comfortable and asked her a bunch of questions."

Jamario posted this photo on twitter and said, "The point is, always be kind and nice to people. You never know what they are going through. This woman changed my outlook on life and how I look at other people. Everyone has a story so do not judge. GO SEE YOUR MUM AND GRANDPARENTS They miss you!"

The picture and story quickly went viral around the world

What do you see in the story
where are they?
How are they similar and different?

explain the story

- why was Eleanor sitting alone?
- why did Jamario approach her?
- as Jamario approached, Eleanor had a look on her face; what do you think she was thinking?
- how do you think she felt when Jamario introduced himself?
- how do you think Eleanor felt when Jamario invited her to his table?
- They chatted and asked questions; what sort of questions do you think they asked?
- Jamario says "you never know what people are going through" what does he mean?
- "Everyone has a story so do not judge" what does he mean?
- why does Jamario say in capital letters on  his tweet, "Go see your Mum and Grandparents!"?
- what can we learn from Jamario?
Why is this story about No Outsiders?