Saturday, 15 December 2018

Football fans

Soft Toys
https://www.itv.com/news/2018-08-20/dutch-football-fans-throw-cuddly-toys-to-sick-children-at-feyenoord-match/

Feyenoord, a football team from The Netherlands invited patients from a children's hospital to watch a home game on a Sunday afternoon. The visiting team, Excelsior, heard about the children coming to the match and organised a surprise.

After finding out the children were sitting on a tier below them, the Excelsior supporters brought hundreds of cuddly toys with them and on a signal before the match, threw the toys down to the children. For a few minutes the sky was raining cuddly toys; the pitch and stands were covered in bears and zebras.

What do you see in the picture?
Where is the picture taken?
What do you think football fans might throw?
Can you see what is being thrown in this picture?

Explain the story

- Why did Feyenoord invite children from the local hospital to their match?
- Why did the football fans decide to give toys to children from the hospital?
- The football fans were form a different city; why didn't the football fans keep the toys and give them to children from their own city?
- What does this show us about football fans today?
- Who could have felt like outsiders at this match?
- How do you think the toys made everyone feel at the match?
- what can we learn from the football fans in this story?
- Why is this story about No Outsiders?

No Outsiders in our school: Teaching the Equality Act in Primary Schools by Andrew Moffat

Reclaiming radical ideas in schools: Preparing young children for life in modern Britain by Andrew Moffat


friendship

kamden-paul-wheelchair2
https://www.globalcitizen.org/en/content/boy-buys-new-wheelchair-best-friend/?fbclid=IwAR39tB1271LflXXGfRMscqIaVYWc4WcLNaRVXujNywE55r9i1RidjQcCjgw

Kamden and Paul are best friends; they both love superheroes and meet up to watch videos. Kamden uses a wheelchair and one day Paul was horrified when he saw his friend's chair tip up and Kamden fall out.

The problem was Kamden had grown too big for his chair, but his family could not afford to buy a new one. Paul said, "His wheelchair has fallen forward so many times and that sucks. Also he has a really hard time pushing it because it's so heavy."

Paul decided he needed to help his friend so he investigated ways to raise money. Paul asked his Mun to set up a Go Fund Me page to raise $3900 for a new chair. In 26 days the page had raised $5935!

Kamden's mum said, "What really contributes to their friendship is that Paul does not see Kamden as someone who has a disability. He sees him as Kamden. Because of that, Kamden truly is himself around him." Paul never acted as though his friend was different.

What do you see in the picture?
How are the children different?
How are the children similar?
How can you tell they are friends?

Explain the story

- Why did Kamden fall out of his wheelchair?
- What do you think Paul did when his friend fell out of his wheelchair? What do you think Paul said to Kamden?
- Why do you think the fundraiser raised so much money so quickly?
- Where did that money come from?
- What does that tell us about people around the world today and attitudes toward disability?
- Kamden's Mum says, "Paul does not see Kamden as someone who has a disability", what does she mean?
- Who could have been an outsider in this story?
- What happened to make sure that person was not an outsider?
- What can we learn from Kamden and Paul?
- Why is this story about No Outsiders?

No Outsiders in our school: Teaching the Equality Act in Primary Schools by Andrew Moffat

Reclaiming radical ideas in schools@ Preapring young children for life in modern Britain by Andrew Moffat

Saturday, 1 December 2018

food bank

Trolleys
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-46388211

People across the UK have responded to a social media campaign to support food banks over Christmas, started by a member of a traveller community in Durham. Watson Harrop is a proud Gyspy living in Durham and he asked his friends to film themselves filling up their trolleys with food bank donations. Many people took up the challenge, which has now gone worldwide.

Watson says, "The concept is quite simple. People film themselves with their food bank donations and challenge friends to do the same on social media." Its irrelevant how much people spend,
"If someone buys ten tins of beans for £2 that is good enough."

Food banks around the UK are reporting a huge intake. A food bank in Darlington said the amount of donations were a miracle of Christmas; "I've never seen anything like it! I was speechless!"
Food banks in Coventry and Stratford were also stunned. Watson's local food bank has enough food to last till July.

What do you see in the picture?
What do you think is happening?

Explain the story

- What is a food bank?
- How do food banks get food?
- Why do you think so many people are giving food?
- When people give food do they know who is going to eat it? Is there a "Christian" section, a "Muslim" section? A section for people of different race, or language? Why not?
- Are the people who donate to food banks bothered about who gets to eat their donation?
- This challenge has gone viral, what does this show about people in the UK today and their attitudes towards different people and people who need help?
- Watson is from the traveller community; why didn't he set up a challenge just to help other people in the traveller community? What does this show about Watson?
- What can we learn from Watson?
- Why is this story about No Outsiders?

No Outsiders in our school: Teaching the Equality Act in Primary Schools by Andrew Moffat

Reclaiming radical ideas in schools: Preparing young children for life in modern Britain by Andrew Moffat


racist graffiti

The racist graffiti was altered for a more positive message (Twitter)
https://inews.co.uk/news/walthamstow-racist-sign-graffiti-transformed-diversity-local-artist/

Racist graffiti found in London this week was transformed in to a celebration of diversity by an artist. The sign originally said "Speak English" but when local artist Chris Walker saw it he added, "we" and then listed a huge range of other languages spoken in the area- Lithuanian, Panjabi (spelled incorrectly), Bulgarian, French, Turkish, Urdu, Tamil, Polish, Romanian, Cockney, French.

Chris posted the sign on twitter saying, "I can only assume our local 'artist' was spooked before he could finish his masterpiece, Allow me to finish it for you."

Chris said he wanted his altered sign to point out "The area's diversity is what makes it so great."

"I saw they'd left me quite a bit of space around their 'artwork' so I thought I'd fill in the blanks."

What do you see in the picture?
What is the sign about?
Why do you think the handwriting is different for English and the other words?

explain the story

- why do you think someone chose to write "Speak English" on a fence? (some people don't understand about No Outsiders yet; some people are scared of difference including hearing language they don't understand. Some people think their city is better with one kind of language, one kind of skin colour, one kind of faith; it's the opposite to what we know and what the artist Chris knows - our city is brilliant because of the different language, different race and different religion!)
- why do people say "Speak English" is racist?
- Why did Chris add "we"?
- Why did Chris add lots of different languages?
-Chris says "They left me quite a bit of space" and he, "filled in the blanks", "Allow me to finish it for you," what does he mean?
- Why didn't Chris just rub out the graffiti or paint over it?
- The new graffiti got lots of press attention and went viral on twitter - what does this show about people in the UK today and what they think about different language?
- What do you think the person who wrote the original words feels about the changes? How do we change attitudes towards difference when someone doesn't understand about No Outsiders?
- Why is this story about No Outsiders?

No Outsiders in our school: Teaching the Equality Act in primary schools by Andrew Moffat

Reclaiming radical ideas in schools: Preparing young children for life in modern Britain by Andrew Moffat





Sunday, 25 November 2018

Refugee store


Choose Love store has opened in Soho, London. In this store people don't shop for themselves, instead shoppers buy gifts for refugees.

The shop asks people to, "Shop your heart out and leave with nothing and feel the love." Shoppers can purchase sleeping bags, blankets and solar-powered lamps, also people can pay for legal advice, help with family reunions or mental health care.

This is the second year the shop has opened. Last year Choose Love raised £750,000 for refugees, paying for 800,000 meals and over 3000 nights of accommodation. 

What do you see in the picture?
Where are the people?
What is the shop called?
What do you think is sold in the shop?

explain the story

- What is a refugee?
- Why has the shop opened?
- Why is there a queue?
- Why does the shop say, "Leave with nothing and feel the love," why is the shop called, "Choose Love"?
- The shop raised £750,000 last year; where did that money come from?
- Do people buying gifts care about the race, religion or background of the refugees they are buying for?
- What do the people buying gifts care about?
- What does this show us about many people in the UK today and their attitude towards refugees?
-  What can we learn from the owners of this shop?
- Why is this story about No Outsiders?








Rainbow Laces

New Zealand rugby players
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-46330364

Rugby teams from around the world played matches this weekend and added a symbol to their kit. World champions New Zealand, and teams from Wales, France and USA wore rainbow laces in their games.

Rainbow laces are a symbol of support for LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender) people and show that everyone is welcome in sport. Earlier this month a famous rugby player Gareth Thomas was attacked in his home city; Gareth is gay and his attacker chose to attack him because he felt hate towards gay people.

Many rugby players want to show their support for Gareth and show all LGBT people that they are welcome at rugby games. Captain of the Cardiff Blues, Blaine Scully, said; "Following the horrible attack on Gareth last weekend, I'm proud to stand with Gareth and the wider LGBT community against hate."

The photo shows the All Blacks team from New Zealand performing the Haka and wearing rainbow laces before their match with Italy.

What do you see in the picture?
What are they doing?
Do you notice anything different about their kit?

explain the story

- Why are rugby players wearing rainbow laces?
- what are rainbow laces for?
- why was Gareth attacked? (Gareth was not attacked "because he is gay"; lots of gay people walk around every day and are not attacked and Gareth has walked around in the week since and not been attacked. Gareth was attacked because one person didn't understand about difference and No Outsiders. Some people are afraid of difference and feel hate towards people they think are different. This person did not understand that gay people are just people who are different in one way; this person needs to visit a school where there are no outsiders so he can learn about different people and equality.)
- why does the rugby captain Blaine say he is "proud to stand with Gareth and the wider LGBT community"?
- how do you think Gareth felt when he saw lots of rugby players wearing rainbow laces?
- how do you think the person who attacked Gareth felt when he saw so many rugby players wearing rainbow laces?
- what can we learn from these rugby players?
- Why is this story about No Outsiders?

No Outsiders in our school: Teaching the equality act in primary schools by Andrew Moffat

Reclaiming radial ideas in schools: Preparing young children for life in modern Britain by Andrew Moffat 

Sunday, 18 November 2018

Suffragettes

A giant mosaic of a suffragette made up of thousands of selfies and pictures of women unveiled at Grand Central
https://www.birminghammail.co.uk/news/midlands-news/suffragette-hilda-burkitt-new-street-15422472

A huge portrait of a woman who lived 100 years ago has been unveiled at Birmingham New St Station. The portrait, by artist Helen Marshall, covers the floor of the station. It is an image of Hilda Burkitt, born in Wolverhampton in 1876, and formed of 3,724 selfies and pictures of women from members of the public.

Hilda was a suffragette, campaigning for women's rights and the right to vote. She was imprisoned at Winson Green Prison in Birmingham and went on hunger strike. She was force fed 292 times.

In 1909 the Prime Minister Herbert Asquith visited Birmingham for a budget meeting and women were not allowed in the building so the suffragettes disrupted the meeting, one woman climbing on the roof. As the Prime left the meeting he was surrounded by suffragettes protesting for women's rights. He boarded a train at Birmingham New St to return to London and as the train left the station, Hilda threw a stone at the train which smashed a window. Hilda was then sent to prison for two months. 

Hilda's picture now rests just metres from where she threw the stone.

What do you see in the picture?
Who do you think the person is?
Where do you think it is and why do you think it has been created?

explain the story

- What were the suffragettes protesting about?
- Why didn't women have equality 100 years ago?
- What is different today?
- What law do we have in Britain that says women and men should be equal? (The Equality Act 2010)
- What other groups of people are mentioned in the Equality Act?
- In 1909 Hilda broke the law, should we be celebrating that?
- Do you think Hilda was right to throw a stone at the train?
- Why did the artist choose to make the image from images of women today?
- How would Hilda feel if she knew 100 years after being labelled a criminal and serving time in prison, she would have her image created in New Street Station?
- What does this show about ideas and society? (they can change)
- What can we learn from Hilda Burkitt?
- Why is this story about No Outsiders?

No Outsiders in our school: Teaching the equality act in primary schools by Andrew Moffat

Reclaiming radical ideas in schools: Preparing young children for life in modern Britain by Andrew Moffat